An Ear To Listen

An ear to listen, a hand to hold

My story’s been told a hundred-fold

About my abuse, about my pain

And my mental health that fucks with my brain


~~~

I’ve told of my struggles, I’ve told of my fight

Whatever I do, I can’t get it right

My body is tired; my mind’s been stricken

With thoughts that make my heartbeat quicken


~~~

My mind is a jumble, just word upon word

My thinking is such that the lines become blurred

When will my world stop spinning around?

My head craves silence, please, not a sound


~~~

Yet, the thunder continues; there is no rest

And bedlam moved in as a permanent guest

Is there no respite for one such as me

While chaos reigns but no one can see

~~~

I sit and ponder these thoughts of mine

And watching the clock, eating the time

The mornings are better; not so afternoons

Bedtime can’t come a minute too soon.

Image by Stefan Keller from Pixabay

46 thoughts on “An Ear To Listen

  1. I cannot imagine what you are going through.
    However, I know there’s a sunlight in your future.
    Nothing last forever, and I know this agony will subside.
    I have a faith, that you will fine the sunshine.
    The sky will be yours and you will fly real soon.
    🔆🕊️

    1. Thank you so much, Devang. You say the nicest of things – thank you for caring. Each day varies so much for me. One day up, one day down etc. I guess that’s better than having every day down. Thank you for having faith in me. Your words are always so kind. X

  2. This poem would make nice song lyrics. I really like this line: watching the clock, eating the time. Was yesterday the day you did art with your friend? Good experience?

    1. Thank you, Jeff. Sometimes I spend ages searching for the right words for a poem, but at other times, they just pop into my head, like today. It was meant to be yesterday that we were going to do our art. As it was, we got talking so much, and the time just flew by, so we’re going to arrange another day to do it. I’m looking forward to that. Also, Peanut choked on something in the morning (no idea what it was, but she really had me scared). She’s never done that before, so I wanted to keep a careful eye on her. After that, she was off her food yesterday but seems to be okay today. Honestly, kids and pets are a real worry sometimes. When we finally have our art day, I’ll post the results on my blog (if it’s any good, that is.)

      1. Good is in .the eyes of the beholders, not the artist. Most artists are too critical of their own work. It is never good enough for them. (I guess that is why I never made it as a poet, I love almost all my poetry.)

      2. a ball of words

        sometimes i wonder
        is it really worth it
        to spend my time on rhyme and verse
        to curse the world and all its faults
        to praise the beauties i can see
        and then i answer
        it is
        to me

        even if not to anyone else
        for myself it does wonders
        to calm a confused mind
        and straighten out my head

        moments like these
        are ever so rare
        in our galloping world
        that to curl myself up
        into a ball of words
        is a pleasure
        of uncommon delight

      3. Sorry I’m so late getting back to you, J. I’ve been out for most of the day – quite rare for me.

        Your poem is beautiful – every word carries meaning and feeling – you should write more like this when the mood takes you. You have talent, my friend, although being able to express ourselves in anyway that suits us is more important that having ‘talent’. I hope it helps you to express yourself in this form. I love the last stanza of your poem – ‘moments like these are ever so rare in our galloping world’ and ‘to curl myself up into a ball of words is a pleasure of uncommon delight.’ Thank you very much for sharing this with me. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, I think you once said to me, and something very similar earlier too. Take good care of you. X 💙

      4. 9ops. Hit the wrong button. A number of publishers and a few critics told me I was not a poet, but a “wordsmith.” I thought wordsmithing was part of writing poetry, but to them my sentiments were too straightforward. I wasn’t hiding my themes in fancy doubletalk. Hopetully times have changed, but I haven’t tried lately.

      5. That’s just appalling, J!! I, too, feel that wordsmithery is part of poetry writing. I would never think to separate the two words in meaning. Poetry should surely be about reaching or touching the reader’s heart or soul, not about hiding themes or expressing ourselves in gobbledegook. My writing is just words coming straight from my heart and mind – I wouldn’t want to write in doubletalk. How is the reader expected to ‘feel’ our poetry even if it dressed up and disguised as something else? How long ago did these people criticise you? Perhaps, you should rethink getting them published (if you still wish to publish at all, that is). I’ve been thinking about self-publishing and have read a lot of self-published poetry books from other people. They are quite successful in their field. If I ever do write a book, I would be doing it for self-satisfaction; definitely not fame or money if I was successful (even though the money could pay for my heating bills that I can’t afford anyway!) 💜

      6. Did you check out those electric heaters I sent you. They are far better than freeszing, and inexpensive to run.
        I ran into those publishers and critics in the 70s, all of them riding on their high horses. I was not looking for fame or fortune either, just a way to communicate with people I would normally never meet.
        You and I both feel the same way about poetry. I can only hope the powers that be will catch up to us someday.
        In those days there was no such thing as self-publishing on anything but a small local scale. But that is a subject for another day. Life calls.
        Keep up the good work. And take care of yourself.

      7. Yes, thank you for those links. I did take a look but then someone gave me a small oil filled radiator for nothing. It’s not especially cheap to run but it’s very effective so only needs to be on for a few minutes at a time if I have it by my side in my living room. Peanut sleeps right next to it so she’s staying warm too! Thanks for caring.

        I’d like to think that publishers, by now, have a different and more up to date view of poetry.

        I’ve been vaguely thinking about self-publishing as I can’t afford to pay a publisher, but one of the things I need to check out is that I’ve heard somewhere (can’t remember where now) that to publish a book of my poetry from my blog, I’d have to delete all my work on my blog so it was only available in the book. I’m not sure whether that applies to self publishing. I need to do some more research. There’s quite a lot to look into. I wouldn’t delete my blog even for the sake of a book as my loyalties and love lie in my blog where I’ve built up good friendships with so many lovely writers who have become friends now. Considering I’ve been writing my blog since 2014 including some poetry. There are still a couple of bloggers who I go back to that time with.

        I do tend to disagree with the tutor I had who said we should ‘murder our darlings’. My ‘darlings’ are usually the parts of my poetry that I’m fondest of. Other than her view about that, she was a very good tutor. I don’t think it’s right to try to ‘correct’ someone’s poems as when we write from our hearts and souls, no one has a right to alter those feelings. Healthy opinions and conversations are fine and welcome but I wouldn’t dream of suggesting that a writer alters their work. It would be like asking them to alter their personality.

        It’s always good to talk to you, J. I value your views and friendship here on WordPress. Take care of yourself 💜

      8. Yes, you’re quite right, J. I never think my work is good enough. I’m my own worst critic. I also love my poetry but a writing tutor last year said that if you want to produce ‘good’ writing, you have to learn to ‘murder your darlings’, meaning that just because we really like something we’ve written, it might not as good as it could be for the reader. Not sure how well I’ve managed to explain that.

      9. Critics are called critics for a reason. Never murder a poem. Everything you write has value, to you if no one else. But your readers are the ones who will tell you if they like a work. If the readers say it has calue, it has value.

    1. Thank you so much, Jenn. You really are so kind. Some days are better than others, but today was a dark day. I keep hoping the light will come and occasionally, I get glimpses of it, but they don’t seem to last. I only have three counselling sessions left now and then, I’m on a long waiting list to see someone else. I feel very wobbly about the whole thing. Thank you for saying I can email you if I need to. That’s lovely of you to say. Love you lots, too Xx 💓🌼💓

      1. I understand how those days can be. Some good, some bad, some light, some dark. Like I said the other day, you’re here in this moment in time and that’s what truly matters, at least to me. I can’t say I understand exactly what you’re going through, because only you know, however, I do understand the pain of abuse and the struggles of mental illness. You’re not alone Ellie.

        If you get a chance, listen to this song. “Say I Won’t” by Mercy Me. It has such a powerful message to it. Sending you so much love and support. ❤️😊 ❤️

      2. Thank you for understanding so well, Jenn. I’m sorry that you have that familiarity with abuse and pain, though. Thank you for making me feel less alone in this. I’ve just listened to the song – it’s beautiful – wonderful words. Thank you for recommending it for me. Loads of love to you, my friend Xx 💓💐💓🌼💓

    1. Thank you so much, Bridgette, for understanding what’s behind my words. I do, definitely, want to be free of this pain, although I think, with losing my counsellor, it might well be a long road. I hope I can manage to cope during the many months on the waiting list for another counsellor. I will do my best. Xx 💖🌼💖

    1. Hello Selma. I’m not back to full-time blogging yet, but just popped into my blog and read your comment. I just wanted to acknowledge it and say thank you for your kind words. I hope you are well, and I look forward to catching up with some of your work once I’m able to get back into blog reading etc. Xx 💐💕

    1. Hello, Britcanwrites (what do you like to be called?). I’m not back to full-time blogging yet as I’m taking a short break, but I just checked into my blog and saw your kind comment. I wanted to acknowledge it and say thank you for your lovely words. I never used to be able to write poetry, but now, I find it’s the best way to express what I’m feeling. I will call into your blog sometime this week, too. Thanks again … Ellie X 💐

  3. Brit works. Okay. I see. I’m glad you found poetry as you’re a natural at it. I hope it brings you light at the end of the tunnel as you express what you’re feeling. I don’t have deep posts on my blog, but I hope you find something you like. You’re very welcome. 🌼

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